#rainbowsforresearch

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Today I’m excited to launch my new fundraising campaign #rainbowsforresearch, raising money for The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund as part of Brain Tumour Awareness Month coming up in March. I’ve been working on this in secret for a little while so I’m very excited to tell you all about it!

As some of you may remember from last year, March is Brain Tumour Awareness month, and it all starts on Friday 2 March (just 3 weeks from now) when The Brain Tumour Charity are asking everyone to don a bandana and, this year, to also get baking to help raise funds and awareness and show your support for the charity. (You can read more about the charity’s Big Bandana Bake campaign for 2018 here)

This is a statistic I often quote – brain tumours are the biggest cancer killer of children and under 40s, but in the UK less than 2% of cancer research funding is spent on research into brain tumours. For the 10,600 people diagnosed each year, this isn’t good enough. You can help us change this. The Brain Tumour Charity aims to raise £150k throughout Brain Tumour Awareness Month in March, which could fund a life saving research project for over two years.

I decided to give my fundraising for The Michael Barry Fund a rainbow spin this year, so I’ve come up with products and ideas which all link in with the bandana campaign, but with lots of rainbow colours! And since the aim of the fundraising is to raise money for brain tumour research, I’ve decided to call it #rainbowsforresearch

Why rainbows?

So why choose a rainbow theme? Well, first and foremost, I love colour, as much of it as I can get, and Michael was just the same. You might also have noticed that rainbows are very “on trend” at the moment – over the past year or so the internet has been going wild for anything rainbow themed, and I think it’s such a great expression of colour, creativity and happiness.

Rainbows can also stand for many things, and I love that rainbows are a symbol of hope, which it’s a perfect theme for the fundraising campaign. Setting up The Michael Barry Fund and getting involved with The Brain Tumour Charity have been my beacons of hope since losing Michael. I recently read a quote on Pinterest which summed up exactly what I mean by this, which I have paraphrased slightly below:

When a rainbow appears, it doesn’t mean that the storm didn’t happen. What it means is that something beautiful has appeared in the midst of the darkness and clouds

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And if you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you’ll know that Michael was a truly colourful character, as you can see from these pictures! Both of which were taken while he was going through chemo. It makes me so proud to see how happy and full of life he was, and that never changed. So all in all, rainbows seemed to be the perfect theme for this year’s fundraising – full of happiness and colour. Just like my Michael.

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Fundraising Products

I’ve put together a new collection of rainbow inspired fundraising products to tie in with the campaign, which are all available to buy now in my pop up online rainbow shop! 100% of the profits from each item will go to Michael’s fund – I have donated all of my time and most of the materials in making these rainbow goodies! All of the items are limited edition and have been made in small runs, and I have priced them affordably to sell so that we can try and raise as much as possible during brain tumour awareness month. So please go and fill your baskets with rainbow goodies, and wear them with me on Friday 2 March!

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My favourite new product is the bandana necklace. I’m a big fan of novelty acrylic jewellery, and I had the idea of making a necklace version of a bandana as a fun new take on the concept. I came up with a simple design based on a bandana tied around your neck, and worked with the lovely folks at Yeah Laser to turn my idea into an amazing acrylic necklace! I’ve made the necklace in a range of colours, including this bright rainbow combo, plus a pastel rainbow version, and red and aqua colour ways to be in keeping with the colours of The Brain Tumour Charity. I’m so happy with how they turned out, and I think they look fab with stripey tops! You can buy the necklaces here.

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I’ve also made a range of wired bandanas (like last year) which you can twist in your hair, in a selection of fun rainbow and cloud themed fabrics! You can buy the bandanas here.

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I stitched up a range of rainbow hued cross stitch embroidery hoop necklaces too, including this slice of rainbow cake – yum! As I mentioned above, The Brain Tumour Charity’s theme for the bandana campaign this year is the Big Bandana Bake, and they are encouraging people to don a bandana and host a bake sale to raise money, so a rainbow cake necklace seemed like the perfect idea! There are a few other rainbow designs to choose from, plus pastel alternatives of each design, which you can buy here.

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I’ve also put together some craft kits so you can make your very own rainbow collar! I thought this might be a fun idea for those of you who love sewing and might want to make something yourself rather than buying a ready made product, and I think the collar is a fun alternative to the bandana. You can buy the craft kits here (and if you’re not much of a sewist, I have popped one ready made version of the collar in the shop here too).

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And to round off the rainbow collection, I whipped up some purses and zip pouches in rainbow themed fabrics, with super pretty iridescent cloud zip charms! I do love a good finishing detail! You can buy the purses here.

I’ll also be continuing to make donations from the rest of my Smile & Make product sales and adding these donations to the #rainbowsforresearch fundraising total. All of my pins and patches are all currently on sale here if you fancy a bargain, and £1 from the sale of each goes to Michael’s fund.

Rainbow Craft Day & Bake Sale

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To kick off brain tumour awareness month and to tie in with the charity’s Big Bandana Bake, Mum and I will be hosting a Rainbow Bake Sale and Craft Day at our workshop in Newcastle-under-Lyme, and we’d love to see you there!

There are two elements to the day. First up, we will be hosting a small rainbow themed bake sale at our workshop, and you can call in anytime from 12pm – 2pm for cake and a chat!

Following on from the bake sale, we’ve put together a rainbowtastic craft session which will run from 2pm to 5pm, and places must be booked in advance. You will have the opportunity to make three fabulous rainbow inspired projects: rainbow bunting embellished with all manner of pretty papercraft, a cloud hanger with colourful raindrops, and an embroidered pennant featuring a colourful house floating away on balloons (just like in the movie Up!). You can find out more details and book your place here.

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Rainbow Raffle

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And finally, I’ve also put together a raffle to win the ultimate handmade rainbow outfit – you could win a Smile & Make handmade rainbow dress and clutch bag, and entry is just £3!

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I’ve been thinking of holding a raffle to win a handmade dress for a while, and it seemed the perfect opportunity to offer the chance to win a rainbow dress as part of #rainbowsforresearch. I first came up with the rainbow dress design last year for a colour walk with In Colourful Company, and it was a big hit! I was asked if I would make the rainbow dress to sell, and I did for a short time, but the design is quite time consuming to sew as the skirt is made up of lots of rainbow panels, so I only ever made a few. But in honour of #rainbowsforresearch and Brain Tumour Awareness Month, for one last time I’m bringing back the rainbow dress, plus a super jazzy rainbow clutch bag to make it a complete rainbow outfit. You can find out more and enter the raffle on the Just Giving page I have set up here.

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That was a bit of an epic post as I wanted to document all of my different fundraising plans in one place, so thank you for reading and sticking with me if you’ve made it this far!!

I should also add that if you’d like to make your own bandana or bandana inspired project to wear on Friday 2 March and support Brain Tumour Awareness Month, you are very welcome to (and very much encouraged!). I shared a few tutorials on the blog as part of the campaign last year to give you some ideas which you can find here and here. And if none of these products take your fancy but you’d still like to make a donation to Michael’s fund, you can do so here, or through Just Giving here.

Lucy x

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DIY Tutorial: Knitted Bandana for #WearItOut

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Following my DIY tutorial last week to sew your own bandana to wear on Friday 3 March for the Bandanas For Brain Tumours #WearItOut campaign in support of The Brain Tumour Charity, tonight I have another tutorial for a different take on the bandana! My lovely Mum Bev, aka Spotty Daisy, designed and knitted this beautiful collar with a ribbon edge effect which you could wear as a bandana on Friday 3 March. Isn’t it pretty? And she very kindly put together the instructions for you to make your own! It’s very easy to wear as one end slips through the other to secure it, and super snuggly too!

How to Make Your Own Ribbon Edge Effect Slip Through Collar

You will require:

  • 1 x 50g ball of DK yarn (more if larger collar required)
  • 4mm knitting needles
  • Stitch holder
  • Darning needle

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Instructions:

Cast on 3 stitches

Row 1. Knit 2 slip last stitch purlwise

Row 2. Knit 1 increase 1 knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise

Row 3. Knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise

Row 4. Knit 1 increase 1, knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until you have 12 stitches

Place these 12 stitches onto a stitch holder

Cast on 3 stitches

Repeat above instructions until you have 12 stitches

Rejoin the first section you knitted (12 stitches) onto your needle, ensuring that the two straight edges are on the outside of your knitting (i.e. the edges where you have increased should both point inwards to create a cut ribbon effect (see photo below) 24 stitches in total

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Knit across the 24 stitches for 30 rows, remembering to always slip your last stitch purlwise on every row

Now rib (K1 P1) to last stitch, then slip last stitch purlwise

Repeat this for a total of 8 rows

Rib 8, cast off 8 stitches, rib 7, slip last stitch purlwise

Rib 8, cast on 8 stitches, rib 7, slip last stitch purlwise (24 stitches in total) (this creates the hole for your collar to thread through, it’s the same procedure as when making a button hole)

Rib for 8 more rows, remembering to always slip last stitch purlwise

Now knit every row (always slipping last stitch purlwise) for approximately 15 inches (or however long you need the collar to be, check your neck measurement as you knit to ensure a comfy fit!)

Rib (K1 P1) for 18 rows, always remembering to slip last stitch purlwise

Knit 30 rows, again remembering to slip last stitch purlwise

Knit 11, slip next stitch purlwise, slip remaining 12 stitches onto a stitch holder

Working on the 12 stitches left on your needle:

Knit 1, knit 2 together, knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise

Knit to last stitch, slip last stitch purlwise

Repeat the above two rows until you have 2 stitches remaining

Cast off

Pick up 12 stitches from stitch holder

Knit 11, slip last stitch purlwise

Knit 9, Knit 2 together, slip last stitch purlwise

Repeat these two rows until you have 2 stitches remaining

Cast off

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If you do knit your own bandana to wear on Friday 3 March, don’t forget to share a picture using the hashtag #WearItOut, and why not text TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

Thanks for your support!

Lucy x

DIY Tutorial: Twist Tie Bandana for #WearItOut

In two weeks time on Friday 3 March I’ll be asking you all to grab a bandana and #WearItOut in support of The Brain Tumour Charity (which you can read more about in my last post). This year, the theme of the campaign is to Make your own bandana, Buy one or Use one you already have, so I’ve put together a simple tutorial to encourage you to Make your own wired bandana to wear on the day. I made 30 of these bandanas to sell in my Etsy shop in support of the campaign and they proved to be extremely popular, selling out in less than 12 hours!

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I personally love to wear wired bandanas since I find them easy to style, and much better at staying put in my fine slippy hair. You can just twist the bandana in your hair and you’re ready to roll! If you’d prefer a bandana without a wire, I’ve explained how to adapt the pattern at the end of the post. And if sewing isn’t your thing, I’ll be posting another tutorial to make a very pretty knitted bandana in a few days, put together by my lovely Mum, Bev of Spotty Daisy.

The weather hasn’t been great here and some of the pictures are a little darker than I would like, but hopefully you can still get the idea!

How To Make Your Own Wired Bandana

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Supplies:

  • Fabric of your choice – you will need a piece measuring 88cm x 13cm (see later in the post for tips on how to make the bandana from just a fat quarter, or how to make the bandana reversible)
  • Matching thread
  • Craft wire 2mm thickness – you will need a 95cm piece
  • Washi tape (optional)

Tools:

  • Sewing machine
  • Iron
  • Fabric scissors
  • Pins
  • Ruler
  • Fabric marker if you have one, or a pencil will do!
  • Point turner – you can use a knitting needle, or anything with a blunt point

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STEP 1: draw the bandana shape & cut out your fabric. Take your ruler and draw a rectangle measuring 88cm x 13cm on your fabric, using an erasable fabric marker if you have one. Just a pencil will do if not, as the lines you draw will not be seen when the bandana is finished.

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Once you have drawn out the rectangle, you need to taper in the short edges of the rectangle to create a pointed shape at the ends of your bandana. Measure in and mark 3cm from each corner along the long edges of the rectangle. Then mark the halfway point (6.5cm) of each short edge. Using a ruler, join these marks together, as shown below.

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Cut out the rectangle and cut around the pointed edges you have drawn, which should give you a shape as below.

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STEP 2: Fold in half, then pin and stitch the sides. Fold your bandana in half along the longest width, so the right sides of the fabric are facing together. Pin the raw edges together.

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Make sure to leave an opening in the centre of about 6cm so that you can turn your bandana inside out and thread in the wire once you have sewn it. Use 2 pins to mark each side of this gap to remind you to stop sewing here!

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Sew along the raw edges using a 1.5cm seam allowance, and make sure to back tack at the beginning and end of each seam. Start from the pointed edge and sew towards the middle.

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Once you reach the edge of the opening which you have marked with two pins, pivot and sew off the edge of the fabric at 90 degrees as shown below. This will help to keep the opening neatly tucked inside when you turn the bandana the right side out. Repeat from the other pointed edge.

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STEP 3: Trim your seam allowances & turn the right way out. Trim your seam allowances down to about 1 cm. Cut diagonally across the corners, but be careful not to cut too close to the stitching line.

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Turn the bandana the right way out. Use a point turner to poke out the pointed corners and keep them sharp. I use a bamboo point turner, but you can use anything with a blunt point, like a knitting needle. Be gentle and make sure not to poke a hole through the seam!

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STEP 4: Press! Give the bandana a really good press with your iron.

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STEP 5: Make and insert the wire. Take your craft wire and cut a length measuring 95cm. Fold each end in by 5 cm, then twist together as below. This will prevent having a sharp end to the wire which could poke through the fabric and worse, poke you!

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If you have some washi tape to hand, you could cut a strip and wrap it around the edge of the wire as below, just to be extra careful.

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Now carefully insert the wire through the opening. Once the wire is in place, try to grip each end of the wire in each corner of the bandana and give it a good pull to straighten the wire out, as it can get a little twisted as you thread it in through the opening.

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STEP 6: Topstitch the opening. The last step is to sew up the opening you have just inserted the wire through. Use thread in the same colour as your fabric, and stitch close to the edge as shown above. Back tack at the beginning and end of the seam to secure it.

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And ta-da – you have a fabulous new bandana to wear! Now for the final and most important step…

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STEP 7: Wear It Out! On Friday 3 March, wear your handmade bandana proudly in support of The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, take a picture of yourself wearing it and post it to social media using the tag #WearItOut, and text TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

Wired Bandana from a Fat Quarter

If you don’t have a wide enough piece of fabric to cut out your bandana, you can easily make one from a fat quarter! My lovely friend Daisy of Make Thrift London recently gifted me a set of fat quarters cut from vintage bedding, which I thought would be perfect for making bandanas.

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To cut a bandana from a fat quarter, you will basically need to cut it in two halves and sew these together along the middle, and the rest of the construction is then the same as above. So, you will need to draw out two rectangles measuring 45.5cm x 13cm, and then taper one end of each rectangle as shown in Step 1 above. This should give you two pointed rectangles as below.

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Pin the two rectangles together along the flat short edge, right sides of the fabric together.

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Sew along this edge using a 1.5cm seam allowance, and back tack at the ends. Then press the seam open as below.

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Now follow on from Step 2 above, and make sure to pay particular attention to Step 7!

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Reversible Wired Bandana

If you’d like to make your bandana more versatile, why not use a different fabric for each side and make it reversible? You’ll need to cut a rectangle measuring 88cm x 8 cm from two different fabrics, as illustrated below.

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Then taper the ends of each rectangle to create a pointed edge by measuring in 3 cm from each corner along the top of each rectangle, then use a ruler to draw a line from this mark to the bottom corner.

Or, if you don’t have wide enough pieces of fabric to hand, you could use 2 fat quarters and cut out 2 rectangles measuring 45.5cm x 8cm from each fabric, as below.

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You’ll then need to taper the ends as below.

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Next, pin the matching rectangles along the straight edges.

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Sew along this edge using a 1.5cm seam allowance, and press open.

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Pin the two rectangles together all along the raw edges, right sides facing. Make sure to leave a gap in the centre of about 6cm so that you can turn your bandana inside out once you have sewn it. Use 2 pins to mark each side of this gap to remind you to stop sewing.

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Sew all around the raw edges using a 1.5cm seam allowance, and make sure to back tack at the beginning and end of the seam. Then, follow on from Step 3 above, and you’ll have a nifty reversible bandana!

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Making a Bandana Without A Wire

If you would prefer to make a bandana without a wire so you can simply tie it in your hair or around your neck, it’s very simple to adapt the instructions above. The main change you will need to make is to cut out a longer piece of fabric, as the bandana will need to be longer so that you can tie a knot to secure it in your hair or around your neck. Ideally, you’ll need to cut a piece of fabric measuring at least 110cm x 13cm. Then follow the instructions as above, but don’t insert the wire!

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To make a non-wired bandana out of a fat quarter, you’ll need to cut two rectangles measuring at least 56.5 x 13cm, and follow the instructions as above, skipping the step where you insert the wire.

Or to make it double sided, you’ll either need to cut a rectangle measuring at least 110 cm x 8 cm from two different fabrics, or cut 2 rectangles each measuring at least 56.5cm x 8cm from two different fabrics, and again follow the instructions as above, skipping the step where you insert the wire.

I look forward to seeing your makes on Friday 3 March! And don’t forget to take a picture of yourself on the day wearing your bandana and post it to social media using the tag #WearItOut, and text TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

Hopefully you can follow my explanations above, but do let me know if you need any help! Happy sewing!

Lucy x

#WearItOut

On Friday 3 March, exactly one month today, will you wear a bandana and join me in supporting The Brain Tumour Charity’s #WearItOut campaign? Our united community will come together to raise awareness and vital funds for research into brain tumours – all while rocking a bandana! It’s especially poignant for me this year as the date falls just after the first anniversary of losing Michael, and I’d love it if everyone who knew and loved Michael, or who has come to know our story from my blog or Instagram, will don a bandana and make a stand with me on 3 March.

This is a statistic I often quote, but in the UK less than 2% of cancer research funding is spent on research into brain tumours. For the 10,600 people diagnosed each year, this isn’t good enough. You can help us change this. The Brain Tumour Charity aims to raise £150k throughout Brain Tumour Awareness Month in March, which could fund 600 days of research.

This year, the theme of the campaign is to Make your own bandana, Buy one or Use one you already have, so it couldn’t be easier to join in! I’ve been making a mountain of bandanas which I will be selling in my Etsy shop to support the campaign, and donating 100% of profits to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund. I’ll also be encouraging all of my creative pals to make your own or style up something you already have! Read on for more ideas of how you can get involved later in this post.

Whatever you do, make sure to wear your bandana loud and proud on the 3 March and get people talking about brain tumours. Post a selfie on social media using the hashtag #WearItOut, or wear one to work, to the post office or the supermarket and tell everyone about the campaign! Keep your eye on my Instagram feed as on 3 March I’ll be giving away a few Tip Top prizes for the best bandana pictures you share!

If you choose to make your own bandana or style something you already have, I’d love it if you could make a small donation to support the campaign by texting TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

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To kick things off, with a bit of digging I’ve managed to find an excellent snap of Michael in a bandana to inspire us all. So here he is rocking a bandana at a festival! I think this was taken the summer before I met Michael, so I’m guessing it was at Truck or Reading? Always with his polo shirt buttoned up!

Buy it

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I’ve made a whole batch of fun and colourful bandanas which are now up for sale in my Etsy shop. I’ve made two varieties, either with a wire to easily twist and wear in your hair, or without a wire so you can tie it in your hair, around your neck, on your bag, around the brim of your hat, around your wrist – whatever you can think of! They are a slim design, equivalent to a traditional square bandana which has been rolled up, as I find this easy to style!

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I’ve used bright colours and bold prints, all in crisp 100% cotton, and every bandana is a one off. Each bandana is finished with a woven label reading #WEARITOUT in support of the campaign. I’ve made some in shades of red and turquoise, which are the colours of The Brain Tumour Charity. I even managed to find a beautiful Liberty Tana Lawn in a print named after the Olympic Diver Tom Daley, who is a patron of the Charity, which is available in the Charity’s colours, so I had to use it!

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You could also head to The Brain Tumour Charity’s online shop to buy one of the Charity’s bandanas. There are two designs to choose from!

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Make it

Why not unlock your creative talent and design your own bandana? The possibilities are endless! I’ll be posting tutorials here in the coming weeks for how to make a simple square bandana, or how to make a wired twist tie bandana like the ones I have for sale in my Etsy shop. And I’d love to see how you guys interpret the concept. Basically, as long as it’s something you can tie around your hair or your neck, anything goes in my book! So why not knit your own, crochet something, make one out of pom poms, upcycle an old tea towel or cushion cover? Here’s one I whipped up by making a patchwork out of scraps of fabric from each of the dresses I have made!

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You could take a bandana or scarf you already have and jazz it up, maybe add a fun trim like the pom pom border below, or cover it in glitter! You could even just take a plain bandana, handkerchief or square of fabric, grab a sharpie and use your design skills to doodle something fun!

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And if you’re looking for more inspiration, there are fun tutorials on The Brain Tumour Charity’s website to make the designs below, or you can apply for a free fundraising pack which includes stencils and other ideas of how to make your own!

If you do make your own, don’t forget to share a picture using the hashtag #WearItOut, and text TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

Use it

Why not look in the back of your wardrobe and wear a bandana that you already have? It’s the perfect way to get involved this Brain Tumour Awareness Month and look great doing it! If you’re anything like me and have a hoarded collection of vintage scarves, now’s the perfect time to show them off, and I’d love to see how you style yours! I tried styling a quirky lipstick print scarf Michael gave me for Christmas a few years ago.

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If you choose to wear your own, don’t forget to share a picture using the hashtag #WearItOut, and why not text TMBF81 £5 to 70070 to donate £5 to The Brain Tumour Charity: The Michael Barry Fund, or make a donation here.

I’m really excited about this campaign as it’s so easy to get involved. I can’t wait to see how everyone rocks their bandanas! Thank you for your support!

Lucy x